London On A Budget

May 30, 2013 in Uncategorized

London is a beautiful and unique city that has a lot of different attractions to offer. However, in one of the most expensive cities in the world, sometimes going out and enjoying yourself can become quite pricey and can limit your options. But don’t despair; here at Party Earth we’ve got you covered and have put together a few options of inexpensive or even free things to do in Soho, Mayfair, Central London and more!

I bet the idea of spending your Friday night at the London Natural History Museum has never looked too appealing, however, it might be time to rethink it! On the last Friday of every month (excluding December), Lates with MasterCard provides a unique experience in London’s Natural History Museum. The after hours attraction features a Dinosaur gallery and unique exhibitions that change monthly. Although it is free to attend Lates, you will have to buy tickets for select exhibitions and some special events, but prices are budget friendly. Live music and food is also provided, making this a fun spot to meet up with friends and enjoy something new!

Lavish and extravagant, Harrods is known worldwide for its high-end shops, exclusive boutiques, and expensive department stores. It’s certainly not a destination where you want to open your wallet too wide (or at all), but is still worth the visit to watch in awe as shoppers drop thousands of dollars on a “couture” or “vintage” item. The ancient Egypt inspired décor and elegant seven-floor building featuring over three hundred and thirty departments, makes it a spot more than worth your time to explore. If you happen to work up an appetite from all the window-shopping, the mega-store also provides an abundance of food halls. Take a gander at their amazing selection of produce and meats, eat at the sushi bar, or stop in on one of the many eateries on the floor. Believe it or not, an hour or two can easily slip away while wandering the Harrods food halls.

If it’s nice day out, why not spend it with some friends in Hyde Park? Located in central London, the park provides visitors a peaceful oasis from the busy pace of the city around them and it’s free! There are plenty of activities that you can do once inside the park, such as swimming in the lake, boating, tennis courts, horseback riding, cycling, and plenty of room for team games like rugby, cricket, and softball. If it’s wintertime, starting in November through January, spectators can enjoy ice-skating in the park. Also, why not catch up on some London’s history and visit some of the famous buildings and monuments that Hyde Park has to offer- including the famous Achilles statue, Diana Memorial Fountain, and the Serpentine Bridge.

Lastly, be a tourist for a day and hit the triangle of plazas between Leicester Square, Trafalgar Square, and Piccadilly Circus. This is the UK’s version of America’s Times Square and one of the most fun things to do in London. Firstly, Leicester square is considered the heart of London’s entertainment district and always provides great people watching. This spot will be buzzing with tourists, theatergoers, and a variety of captivating street performers. There is truly never a dull moment at Leicester Square. Where Leicester Square is rich in entertainment, Trafalgar Square is rich in London culture and history.  One can spend the day exploring statues and sculptures that are unique and iconic to London, including the busts and plinths of the royal British forefathers and a massive fountain that lights up at night. And last but not least, rounding out the triangle of plazas is the Piccadilly Circus. A world famous traffic circle built in 1819; Piccadilly Circus connects Regent Street to Piccadilly and is a common meeting place before heading out to neighboring burrows like Chinatown or Soho. The Circus has plenty of attractions to offer that will keep cinema buffs, musical theater lovers, and shopaholics occupied for hours on end.

Daniel Hogan is a writer at Party Earth - a global media and entertainment company that publishes reviews and listings of the best social experiences around the world including: clubs in Paris, beaches in Ibiza, things to do in London, bars in Los Angeles, parks in New York, festivals and concerts everywhere, and more.

Things to do in Europe

May 15, 2013 in Uncategorized

Europe is a continent sized adventure land, mesmerizing idealistic tourists with the promise of history, romance, and memories to last a lifetime. With so many enticing options, planning your trip across the pond can be overwhelming. Here are a few places that are sure to captivate your adventurous spirit and exceed your expectations for the ultimate European vacation!

Vondelpark (Amsterdam)

Nestled in the heart of Amsterdam, Vondelpark is the city’s largest park, boasting a bike trail, multiple ponds, four restaurants, and stunning grassy fields. Thousands of locals, tourists, and students flock to Vondelpark daily, soaking up the sun’s heat in a relaxed, outdoor setting. Groups of friends are always seen playing soccer on the grassy landscape or riding bikes around the park’s outer path. During your European adventure, Vondelpark should definitely be on your list of things to do in Amsterdam.

Las Ramblas (Barcelona)

The energetic atmosphere and cultural vibe filling Las Ramblas makes it one of the most captivating streets in Barcelona. It is not only a beautiful avenue, outlined with towering trees and ornate buildings, but a popular shopping quarter. Local and internationally known shops and stores, like Zara, line the outskirts of Las Ramblas, which is always filled with locals, tourists, and those simply out for a stroll. One of the key attractions on Las Ramblas is La Boqueria, an outdoor market offering specialty foods, meats, seafood, and desserts. After spending a day of shopping on Las Ramblas, La Boqueria is the perfect location to rejuvenate during lunch and experience the local culture.

Hofbräuhaus (Munich)

A signature to Bavarian culture is the beer and Hofbräuhaus is a historic landmark in Munich combining this German tradition with bratwurst, pretzels, and good company. The moment you step into the doors of Hofbräuhaus, sounds of a Bavarian band and guests singing national songs ring through your ears. The ceiling is adorned with elaborate paintings of flowers while waitresses, donning traditional Bavarian dress, weave through the crowds selling giant pretzels to patrons. A “come as you are” mentality fills the atmosphere of Hofbräuhaus. Rather than being seated by a waitress, guests are welcome to sit at any one of Hofbräuhaus’ long tables, fostering a friendly environment of mutiple nationalities. For things to do in Munich, Hofbräuhaus should definitely be at the top of your list.

Piazzale Michelangelo (Florence)

Perched upon a hill overlooking the entire Florentine valley, Piazzale Michelangelo is one of Florence’s most unique and beautiful squares because of its overarching view. Although the square is located a bit outside the city’s center, about a 10 minute cab drive, it is the perfect location to relax with friends over a bottle of wine while admiring the Florentine landscape. The panorama is especially breathtaking just before sunset, when guests see Florence dazzling in lights. Though Piazzale Michelangelo is mainly a tourist hub, with just a few locals, it is definitely one of the most spectacular places to visit Florence.

Daniel Hogan is a writer at Party Earth - a global media and entertainment company that publishes reviews and listings of the best social experiences around the world including: things to do in Amsterdam, beaches in Ibiza, plazas in Rome, bars in Los Angeles, parks in New York, festivals and concerts everywhere, and more.

Summer Concert Guide for the European Backpacker: Italy

April 30, 2013 in Uncategorized

If you yearn to experience the world, Europe is a great place to start. It is full of sites, cities and towns, diverse culture, rich history, food of every imaginable cuisine, and so much more. There is probably no better way to fully embrace all this than by backpacking. Backpacking has become a widely popular and cheap alternative to exploring Europe. With summer season fast approaching, college students and others are gearing up to gain an experience that will last a lifetime. If your summer plans include a trip to Europe, be sure to put Italy on your itinerary.  While the art, architecture, history and food may catch your attention; Italy also has a busy summer schedule of concerts. We have narrowed down five great venues in three of Italy’s principal cities.  If you love music, you don’t want to miss out on these experiences.

Rome is the capital of Italy and is without a doubt one the most beautiful cities in the world. Its history dates back to over a thousand years and backpackers come from all over the world to admire the treasured masterpieces of Roman art and architecture. There is no surprise that Rome is also home to two of Italy’s best music venues. If you’re looking for concerts in Rome, then you need to check out the Ippodromo Capannelle and PalaLottomatica. The Ippodromo Capannelle is a racecourse and entertainment venue built in 1925, located in the Capannelle neighborhood of Rome. Today it hosts four main horse races, but since 2010, the Ipprodromo Capannelle has been the site for the Italian rock festival, Rock in Rome. This much-anticipated event takes place during the summer and lasts over a month. Famous artists who have previously performed at this venue include Slash, deadmau5, and Snoop Dogg (Snoop Lion). Another remarkable indoor sports and concert arena located in Rome is PalaLottomatica. With a capacity to hold over 11,000 patrons, this venue provides a real concert experience where thousands of die-hard fans can gather together and enjoy an unforgettable performance.  Famous acts that have played here have been The Rolling Stones, Carlos Santana and the Spice Girls.

For live music buffs heading to Tuscany, there are also tons of amazing concerts in Florence. While Rome provides backpackers with bigger and grander venues to watch artists perform, Florence hosts equally as pleasing, but smaller venues, where fans can enjoy music at a more intimate level. The Viper Theatre is a great example of this. Located just 20-minutes outside of Florence, The Viper Theatre is a popular live concert venue for both local and international bands and DJs to perform. Additionally, what separates this venue from others in Florence is that it offers DJ, music production, stage engineer, and sound engineering courses as well as adult and children’s theater workshops. The Viper Theatre is also best known for hosting the 2011-2012 Emergenza Festival, which showcased 70 emerging pop, rock, and alternative music bands. But for those of you who are itching for a bigger concert atmosphere in Florence, the Stadio Artemio Franchi venue is for you. This soccer stadium was built in 1931 and is home to the ACF Fiorentina soccer team. However, when the stadium isn’t being occupied by sporting events, it also puts on great live concerts. Past performers who have played in this arena include iconic artists like David Bowie, Madonna, and Bruce Springsteen.

Venice is located in the northeastern part of Italy and is on every itinerary for those backpacking around the country. It has a variety of beautiful museums, renaissance architecture, mouthwatering restaurants, and other attractions that could keep a backpacker’s itinerary filled for days. But if you’re wanting to see concerts in Venice, a “must go” is the Venice Jazz Club. Tucked away on a quiet canal, the Venice Jazz Club is the only one of its kind in the city and provides an intimate music venue experience with an artsy, almost underground, exclusive vibe. The club attracts some of the area’s finest jazz musicians and those who appreciate classic and modern jazz, Latin jazz, and bossa nova, gather here for an evening filled with great Italian food, wine, and smooth sounds.

Daniel Hogan is a writer at Party Earth – a global media and entertainment company that publishes reviews and listings of the best social experiences around the world including: bars in Paris, pubs in London, beaches in Ibiza, plazas in Rome, parks in New York, festivals and concerts everywhere, and more.

Five Incredibly Hot Venues Around the World

April 18, 2013 in Uncategorized

Traveling the world is an exciting adventure in itself, but knowing the exclusive and best-kept secrets of the cities you are visiting makes the trip that much better. Even if you’re not abroad or in an unfamiliar city, there are places that are simply so high-brow or underground that you would not know about them even if you’ve lived in the same city for your entire life. These five clandestine venues fit that category and are guaranteed fun experiences, all for different and exciting reasons.

If you’re looking for secretive things to do in Hollywood, one the best places to start would be The Sayers Club. The only hint that there’s a happening club spot behind the sign-less façade is the usual line of decked out partiers, praying to get in. Despite its relative anonymity, the door is very tough due to the high volume of industry leaders and celebrities that frequent this sleek speakeasy. If lucky enough to get inside, visitors are treated to unannounced musical performances from notable artists, while also being able to rub shoulders with some of the most powerful people in Tinseltown while waiting for an $18 drink.

Similar to The Sayers Club with its hipster, yet swanky vibe, New York’s SL (Simyone Lounge) is guarded with classic velvet ropes, followed by a mysterious black-mirrored entrance. Once inside the club, there is plenty to please the eye from the beautiful people to the enticing illuminated glass bricks that line the walls. For those who don’t want to mingle with the run of the mill models, socialites, and Wall Street elites, there is an ultra-exclusive bottle service lounge with an intimate DJ experience. Also, when you’re inside make sure to look up to see an aerial view of the attractive clientele mingling with each other thanks to the mirrored ceilings.

Located in the Meatpacking District with “SL,” the Boom Boom Room, now known as Top of the Standard, offers the epitome of elegance with its ornate 1970’s décor and prime, 360-degree views of Manhattan. The Top of the Standard is most likely the most difficult place on this list to gain access to, as it is “Members Only” after 10 pm. However, if you can finagle your way in, you are in for a treat with a circular center bar that reaches the ceilings and illuminates gold in spectacular fashion. The number one tip once you’re inside is to try one of their specialty drinks because while they cost over $20, you really do get what you pay for. Try to go towards the beginning of the week for the best opportunity to gain access to the exclusive penthouse retreat.

Switching up the vibe from the chic and elegant NYC clubs above, The Box in New York on the Lower East Side is possibly the most exclusive bars/circus in the world. Barack Obama could walk up to the door and get denied without a prior reservation or name on the guest list (probably not, but you get the point). The crowd is a mix of high rollers, Wall Street execs, successful artists and musicians, and everyone’s favorite trust fund babies. The first half of the night consists of rock and hip hop blaring throughout the club, marking a pretty typical club experience. However, at 1am, The Box sets itself apart with magicians, burlesque dancers, and acrobats among other unexpected performers.

Jumping across the pond to the black sheep of the list, The Church in London is one of the more unique and fun experiences one can have. Only open for four hours from the late morning to the early afternoon on Sunday, The Church is anything but stoic. Not very exclusive, The Church is open to anyone with an open-mind, a party attitude, and a willingness to ride on the Tube, drunk, in full costume, next to people who are going to actual church. Inside The Church there is a drink limit of four beers or ciders, which almost everyone reaches. Then the four hours is compromised of dancing while watching stripper shows on stage and monitoring the big screen in the middle of the stage that shows cleverly captioned pictures of the crowd.

Daniel Hogan is a writer at Party Earth – a global media and entertainment company that publishes reviews and listings of the best social experiences around the world including: bars in Paris, pubs in London, beaches in Ibiza, plazas in Rome, things to do in Los Angeles, festivals and concerts everywhere, and more.

Fun Upcoming Events Across the Globe

April 1, 2013 in Uncategorized

Around the world, cities are gearing up for the masses of work-ridden drones looking to spice up their life with something totally new and different. From the glitziness of Paris Fashion Week to a laid back LA Beer Festival or even the historical horse races at Palio di Siena, there is something to entice your need for adventure. So call in sick to work and leave the fluorescent lights of your office behind to explore the happenings you won’t want to miss. Don’t worry, that business proposal cant wait!

LA Beer Festival

Have you ever wanted to walk the bustling streets of New York City with an ice-cold beer in your hand while hanging out with friends and making new ones? Well, for those on a tight budget, New York is coming to you right here in Los Angeles! The LA Beer Festival takes place at Paramount Studios with the New York City street set as your backdrop. The streets, while not bustling with New Yorkers, echoe with the sounds of a DJ spinning some tunes as partygoers float between vendors and brewers. Tickets usually run $40 a session and there are two sessions in which the brewer pours unlimited four-ounce beers.

WMZQ Fest 2013 starring Luke Bryan

On May 18, 2013, country music fans from across the world will flock to Bristow, Virginia, not for some good ol’ Southern hospitality, but for WMZQ Fest 2013, every country music lovers dream. This year, Luke Bryan is the main performer and past acts have included Miranda Lambert, Chris Young, and Jana Kramer. After a full day of soaking up the sun with country music playing in the background, fans have a chance to meet and greet some of their favorite stars. The day is fast approach so look for WMZQ Fest tickets soon!

The 2013 National Puerto Rican Day Parade

New York has always been the melting pot of America, housing an eclectic mix of nationalities. Each year, the Puerto Rican community in New York celebrate with the National Puerto Rican Day Parade in June along Fifth Avenue to 79th Street. Thousands of Puerto Ricans congregate along the parade route donning red, white, and blue, while Puerto Rican flags sway with in the wind. The parade is then followed by a festival, boasting Puerto Rican dishes and activities for all ages, on 152nd Street, between Jackson and Union Avenue.

Palio di Siena 2013

Picture the thundering hooves of horses gallivanting in the middle of a historic square in the heart of the Italian countryside. Well, you don’t have to just imagine this because each year in Siena, Italy, the horse race, Palio di Siena takes place in Piazza del Campo, attracting thousands of visitors to the hillside village. Each horse represents one of Siena’s districts, called contrade, and the winning contrade gains bragging rights for the entire year while their district’s banners hang throughout the city. Siena is extremely small so make sure to get a hotel room many months in advance. The race is free for standing room, however for those willing to drop a few hundred euros, there are bleacher seats.

Paris Fashion Week 2013

Paris is not only the city of light and romance, but a city with impeccable fashion designs. During Paris Fashion Week, the most renowned designers from every corner of the globe come together for a week of art in the form of clothes. June 26, 2013 marks the beginning of Paris Fashion Week 2014, which will be debut men’s spring and summer fashions for the upcoming year through June 30, 2013. Runway shows include Chanel, Lanvin, Commes des Garcons, and more, all marked by a mix of celebrities and fashion gurus. The city comes alive with tourists and locals all wanting to enjoy the spirit of Parisian fashion.

Daniel Hogan is a writer at Party Earth - a global media and entertainment company that publishes reviews and listings of the best social experiences around the world including: things to do in Paris, pubs in London, beaches in Ibiza, plazas in Rome, parks in New York, festivals and concerts everywhere, and more.

 

Say Goodbye To Winter Blues With These Top Five Chicago Events

March 16, 2013 in Uncategorized

There are times in Chicago where the incessant snow and howling gales seem as if they will never vacate the Windy City. Although winter hasn’t entirely released its clutches on Chicago, the fantastic events on the calendar will surely lure you out of your front door. With the variety of things to do in Chicago from spring until fall, it can be difficult to decide which events to attend. While a few uncertainties may linger, be sure to check out these five incredible events in Chicago that best represent the vibrant character of the city.

With the largest Irish-American population in the United States, there is no doubt that this is the place to be for St. Patrick’s Day. Before you get ahold of too many pints of Guinness, be sure to rise and shine the Saturday prior to the holiday in order to join in on the emerald green rumpus of the St. Patrick’s Day Parade in Chicago. Arrive early for a prime viewing spot of the 10am dyeing of the Chicago River along the Michigan Avenue Bridge or the west side of the Columbus Drive Bridge, as the serpentine waterway assumes a festive shamrock hue. After the main event,check out Chicago’s greatest Irish pubs, such as McFadden’s Restaurant and Saloon and The Galway Arms for a long night of celebration.

Just in case your thirst wasn’t quenched on St. Patrick’s Day, the Chicago Beer Festival is just around the corner! On March 30th, Chicago’s Union Station will be transformed into a debaucherous beer hall for the masses. With 65 hoppy participants to choose from, such as the highly rated Ommegang and Goose Island breweries, the unlimited sampling included in the ticket price is a dream come true. A word to the wise, this event does not sell tickets at the door, so be sure to purchase tickets online prior to attending the festival.

Despite its curious name, Dillo Day has elevated itself to one of the foremost annual Northwestern University traditions since it began in 1972. The event, which derives its moniker from a Texas variation on Groundhog Day, serves as a celebration for the end of the academic year with the raucous liberty of a music festival. With big names such as Nelly, Regina Spektor and Arcade Fire lining up on stage, there’s no doubt that this is the coolest way to say adios to textbooks. As a side note, this festival is only open to members of the Northwestern community and their registered guests.

For those looking for the best way to welcome in the glorious Chicago summer, make sure to mark your calendars for the Chicago Blues Festival. As one of the city’s biggest summer events, the festival tops the charts for the largest free blues festival in the entire world, regularly drawing crowds of over 500,000 each year.  Throughout the three day festival, residents and tourists alike flood Millennium and Grant Parks for blissful days spent lounging on the grass with food from local vendors and the soulful tunes of jazz legends such as Etta James and B.B. King in the background.

If you’re in search of another incredible free Chicago festival, check out the foodie mecca, Taste of Chicago. The festival sieges Millennium Park for a glorious ten day spread, during which over 70 local food vendors offer Chicago classics such as deep dish pizza and Polish sausages. In between meals, take a stroll through the park and catch a live musical performance or perhaps a movie screening once the sun begins to set.  This year is sure to be another jam-packed festival, as Fun headlines at the opening concert to celebrate another year of indulging in Chicago’s finest cuisine.

Daniel Hogan is a writer at Party Earth - a global media and entertainment company that publishes reviews and listings of the best social experiences around the world including: bars in Paris, pubs in London, beaches in Ibiza, plazas in Rome, parks in New York, festivals and concerts everywhere, and more.

In Hindsight, Not So Bad

March 13, 2013 in Uncategorized

New Yorker’s are crazy. We all know it. Which is why I should not be the least bit surprised by their ability to break the heart of their lovers in the public debauchery of a bar.

I mean, besides the irrational and emotional drunk state, these people are dealing with the hazards of an abundance of high-heels that double as daggers, silverware, and those scary-sharp corkscrewy metal things they take the pits out of olives with.

Well I learned my lesson quite quickly on my last visit, when I was on assignment to write a freelance review of one of the top clubs in NYC.

Provocateur is a ridiculously exclusive nightclub tucked in the back of the Gansevoort Hotel, and if you find yourself inside this Manhattan hotspot it’s because you’re a big shot, knows someone who is, or you’re so hot it’s impossible for you to build a snowman…or you’re a lucky scrub with a press pass like me.

Luckily, I was safely tucked behind the velvet ropes by the time a young executive named Sara decided to come clean.

A giant pair of angel wings draped against one wall inside this purple-hued club, and angelic is probably what boyfriend-to-be-gone thought of his lady when she poneyed up several thousand for table service for him and ten of his friends.

I watched from my cozy barstool as the main floor filled up, and the boys all had front row seats to the stunning house dancers who regularly gyrate the night away; certainly the trappings of a perfect night.

After the first few bottles were gone, Sara snuck off to the bar, returning with her boy’s favorite cocktail. She rested the glass in his hands, waited for a lull in the music, and while I eavesdropped, said:

“Three ladies just stopped me and asked if you were single. The last one even gave me their number to give to you and opened an all-expense bar tab in your name for the night. I threw the number away. Also, I cheated on you recently.”

Mimosa flew out of my mouth as she disappeared across the newly roiling dance floor. I called the bartender over, and anonymously sent on over a glass of their strongest whiskey. I figured the least I could do was buy the poor guy a drink.

Daniel Hogan is a writer at Party Earth - a global media and entertainment company that publishes reviews and listings of the best social experiences around the world including: bars in Paris, pubs in London, beaches in Ibiza, plazas in Rome, parks in New York, festivals and concerts everywhere, and more.

In Hindsight, Not So Bad

March 1, 2013 in Uncategorized

New Yorker’s are crazy. We all know it. Which is why I should not be the least bit surprised by their ability to break the heart of their lovers in the public debauchery of a bar.

I mean, besides the irrational and emotional drunk state, these people are dealing with the hazards of an abundance of high-heels that double as daggers, silverware, and those scary-sharp corkscrewy metal things they take the pits out of olives with.

Well I learned my lesson quite quickly on my last visit, when I was on assignment to write a freelance review of one of the top clubs in NYC.

Provocateur is a ridiculously exclusive nightclub tucked in the back of the Gansevoort Hotel, and if you find yourself inside this Manhattan hotspot it’s because you’re a big shot, knows someone who is, or you’re so hot it’s impossible for you to build a snowman…or you’re a lucky scrub with a press pass like me.

Luckily, I was safely tucked behind the velvet ropes by the time a young executive named Sara decided to come clean.

A giant pair of angel wings draped against one wall inside this purple-hued club, and angelic is probably what boyfriend-to-be-gone thought of his lady when she poneyed up several thousand for table service for him and ten of his friends.

I watched from my cozy barstool as the main floor filled up, and the boys all had front row seats to the stunning house dancers who regularly gyrate the night away; certainly the trappings of a perfect night.

After the first few bottles were gone, Sara snuck off to the bar, returning with her boy’s favorite cocktail. She rested the glass in his hands, waited for a lull in the music, and while I eavesdropped, said:

“Three ladies just stopped me and asked if you were single. The last one even gave me their number to give to you and opened an all-expense bar tab in your name for the night. I threw the number away. Also, I cheated on you recently.”

Mimosa flew out of my mouth as she disappeared across the newly roiling dance floor. I called the bartender over, and anonymously sent on over a glass of their strongest whiskey. I figured the least I could do was buy the poor guy a drink.

Daniel Hogan is a writer at Party Earth - a global media and entertainment company that publishes reviews and listings of the best social experiences around the world including: bars in Paris, pubs in London, beaches in Ibiza, plazas in Rome, parks in New York, festivals and concerts everywhere, and more.

Chasing the Loch Ness Monster of Los Angeles

February 14, 2013 in Uncategorized

Somewhere along the Pacific Coast Highway (PCH), past the breaks of Malibu but before Point Magu, hidden amongst the jagged coves and inlets that litter the coastline, is a surf break more myth than wave, called Supertubes. I’d been obsessed with the spot — along with everyone else in Southern California — ever since a video clip came out in 2007 of heaving top-to-bottom barrels running fifty yards down the right-hander reef.

But it turns out, the mystical break only rears its head every couple of years, needing a big west swell coupled with an ultra-low tide. Even those that have ventured to the location when the conditions are right have arrived to unsurfable conditions and settled for better things to do in LA, like a surf session with Matthew McConaughey and a hundred other people at Malibu Surf Rider beach. As such, most people don’t take the trouble to venture along the windy road, and unless you’ve already surfed it before, you won’t even know where to look.

After five years of living in Los Angeles, I still hadn’t tried to conquer the beast. But when the long-range charts last winter showed for an ultra-strong storm with a massive fetch and westerly direction heading our way, the elusive wave popped into the back of my mind. I proposed the idea to my surf buddy Blake, who at least knew which cranny it was tucked into. At first he was reluctant, saying it wasn’t worth wasting the biggest day of the year chasing a wave that might not be breaking, but then I used my super-awesome persuasion skills (mainly offering to buy him Duke’s Malibu afterwards), and we had our plan set.

It was a Wednesday, and the clear air was doing nothing to help the cold bite of the winter morning. We headed north on the PCH, whipping past break after break, tempted to stop every time we passed another firing surf spot. But we had a mission. We winded along the hill-sides, far away from the concrete jungle, and finally pulled over. It must have been the right spot, because a few other cars of surfers were posted up, all of us looking out onto a completely flat ocean.

Overcome with disappointment, we were ready to turn back around and settle for another spot, when on the horizon a set of lines began to stack up. The incoming swells grew as the deep-water hit the reef, the first wave smacked against the giant boulder sitting outside, and then the wave broke, nearly on top of the rocky coast, racing along perfectly down the point, dangerously close to the cliffs. The next wave was bigger, breaking farther out, still dangerously close to the rocks, but makeable. The dozen of us watching all hooted, and then raced to our cars, all trying to be first out to claim their own wave.

I had to jump straight off of the rocks into the strong surf, adrenalin pumping too hard to feel the sting of the 55 degree water. Blake and I made it to the outside unscathed, and before the crowd got too thick, dropped into the biggest barrel of my life, as wide as it was tall, hucking water across the reef as I reeled along inside of it. I spat out of the barrel, totally stoked, scrambling back to the line-up for more. We stayed out in the water for hours, taking some of the worst beatings of all-time, sand in every crevice, enough near death experienced for a lifetime, but all for the occasional unforgettable wave that we would never forget. After nearly dying trying to scramble up the rocks out of the water, we made it out of the pounding surf, and I had to make good on my promise.

We strolled into Duke’s like the king himself, full of swag, knowing that we might be the last group of people to surf Supertubes for years. It’s nice to know that even in a city with 15,000,000 people, Los Angeles still has its secrets.

Daniel Hogan is a writer at Party Earth - a global media and entertainment company that publishes reviews and listings of the best social experiences around the world including: bars in Paris, pubs in London, beaches in Ibiza, plazas in Rome, parks in New York, festivals and concerts everywhere, and more.

The Glitz and Glamour of Holly’weird’

February 5, 2013 in Uncategorized

Ever since transplanting to Los Angeles, I’ve pretty much avoided the opulent and exclusive club scene that the city is most renowned for when it comes to nightlife. I’ve tended to do my boozing on the laid-back Westside, but that was before I received an incoming message on my Facebook page not too long ago. It was from Mariana: a beautiful, fun-loving Italian whom I had grown close to during my studies in Florence. It had been at least a year since we had spoken, so it was quite the surprise when the little red flashing icon on my computer opened up to reveal a message from her, saying she was coming to visit Los Angeles with a group of her girl friends, and wanted me to show them around!

From what I knew about Mariana, I could tell that the casual bars that I called home would not be adequate – she was a club-hopper to the very core. Her perfect day would be a designer shopping spree, tanning, and a night out in a little black dress and stilettos through ultra-exclusive nightclubs.

Now to be honest, another reason I never ventured too far East of the 405 freeway was because without status, money, or women, it can be a nightmare trying to fight the lines into the clubs on Hollywood Boulevard. But suddenly I had four striking Florentine girls who would be following me, and as they say, the world was my oyster.

When they arrived, I directed them to Rodeo drive, which I imagine was something like heaven to them, and after a day of shopping, I met them at their hotel to prepare for a night out at the clubs in Los Angeles. I pretended like I was familiar with the plan, but to be honest, it would be a first for all of us.

By the advice of a friend, I planned for us to check out Beacher’s Madhouse in the Roosevelt Hotel. After a few shots of vodka at a nearby lounge, we walked into the hotel, and the only way I knew we were in the right place was the visible line of well-dressed partygoers that seemed to go on forever. I led the girls to the front, bypassing plenty of angry eyes, and let Mariana do the talking. It turns out beauty is the currency of Hollywood, because next thing I knew we were being led through a secret bookshelf door like something out of an Indiana Jones movie, and down into the weirdest place on earth.

Beacher’s is something like a prohibition-era adult carnival on drugs, with burlesque dancers, fire-eaters, giant costumed animals and little people in green wigs entertaining the hedonistic spectators while live bands and DJs set the mood. Feeling buzzed and thoroughly amused, and a little bit terrified, the girls wanted to dance. We left Beacher’s and even though the rest of the night was new, it all felt fairly normal after such an experience.

I once again was granted immediate entry with the girls into Drai’s, a vegas-style two story nightclub at the top of the W Hotel. The DJ played a blend of house and top-40 music, and after about an hour of dancing, a couple of high-roller movie execs invited the girls (and I) over to their table, where we indulged in shot after shot of tequila that cost more than my month’s salary. As much as I’d like to say it sucked, the night was turning out to be one of the best I’d had in the city. We danced for a while longer and to the disappointment of us all, last call came. The girls didn’t want to go home, and luckily I had one last trick up my sleeve.

We descended back down the elevator to reality, and then stumbled over to the Avalon, which has late night sets that go all the way till sunrise. We jumped and danced in the warehouse-style venue to pounding house music till the wee hours, and by the time I got back to the hotel room and my eyes got heavy, I couldn’t have been happier that Mariana gave me the excuse to finally experience, if for just that once, the high-end decadence of Los Angeles – at least until her next visit.

Daniel Hogan is a writer at Party Earth - a global media and entertainment company that publishes reviews and listings of the best social experiences around the world including: bars in Paris, pubs in London, beaches in Ibiza, plazas in Rome, parks in New York, festivals and concerts everywhere, and more.