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Inequality Debates 9- Education

December 5, 2012 in South Africa, uncategorized

Do Boys Get A Better Education Than Girls?

The previous South African census indicated that in the Western Cape girls stayed longer at schools than boys.Rules allowing pregnant girls to attend schools should help to sustain this trend.

Boys apparently drop out for the need to belong and join gangs. Absent Fathers would be central to this problem.

Many couples want a boy child. Some women stop having children as soon as they have  both a girl and a boy or at least a boy. There will be dreams about this boy having a good education and a successful career

Girls- now girls will get married to a good man hey, and have children, and keep her man happy…

Somehow the reality of the 84% absent fathers does not hit home.

Ha ha ha:) Slowly now. Absent fathers is not an exclusive coloured probem. It is a national pandemic. Here are the urban figures.

Proportion of female urban single parents in each race group:

African            79%

Coloured       84%

Indian             64%

White             69%

Source: South African Institute of Race Relations 2011 report- Healing The South African Family.

The point is: How serious are we about the education and training of girls?

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Do Boys Get A Better Education Than Girls?

Unless you were one of those weird sitting-at-the-front-of-the-class kids,
nearly all of us can remember being kicked out of our beds on a school day.
Right now, 69 million children would jump at the chance to hotfoot it into school
everyday. And the majority of those are girls.

Surely we live in an age where there’s education for all?
It would appear not. There are lots of reasons why girls don’t get an education
in developing countries: make your entrance please, poverty. A poor family
will ask themselves, ‘I can only afford for one of my children to go to school
– will it be my son, who society says will be the sole earner in our family?
Or my daughter, who society says will be a non-earning wife and mum?’
Tough questions, when you and your family are struggling to survive.

Cultural attitudes also play a role – in many places it’s the norm for girls to get
married at an early age. A girl growing up in Chad today has about the same
chance of dying in childbirth as she has of going to secondary school. For
those that survive pregnancy at such an early age, where’s the time or need
for algebra when you’re taking care of your husband and house?

Is Education Gender Unequal?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If a girl is lucky enough to get to school there are often other issues to deal with. Many school toilets are simple pits dug in the ground, which boys and girls have to share with no privacy – imagine how that would have gone down at your
school. And whilst most teachers are supportive and trustworthy, it’s common
for girls to be asked to trade sexual favours for good grades.

 But in the UK girls are doing better in school than boys aren’t they?
In some countries we have indeed seen a culture of girls finding their feet in the classroom. We’ve seen them not only attend school, but blossom academically too. But we must remember that there are still nine million more girls than boys not getting an education around the world.

So we make sure girls get an education and everything’s suddenly ok?
There’s nothing that will make us equal overnight. But we do know this: that
educated girls are healthier, earn more and are better able to protect
themselves – and eventually their children – from exploitation, violence and
poverty. They are more able to contribute to their family, community and
country. And fulfil some of that incredible potential.

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